Gila Svirsky: A Personal Website

A Tad About Me

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Women in Black: A Book
Women in Black: Conference 2005
Security Council Address
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My Grandsons!
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At age 4 - Eitan on left, Omer on right.
I'm 67.5 years old and feeling a little posterity-minded.  So here's how I want to be remembered:  a writer and an Israeli Jew deeply involved in peace and human rights activism.
But here's the life I really led:
Gila Svirsky played a lot of basketball and was quite good at it.  Anyway, she loved playing.  She day-dreamt basketball to relax and to put herself to sleep at night.  This was the defining character-shaper of her life.  Long live team sports.  Especially women's basketball.
And I have a great family.  This website is dedicated to the three women in my life: Judy, Mieka, and Denna.
Here they are below, in that Kodak sort of way.
And if you are curious about more details...
Or watch a slide show of our recent wedding...

My life- and love-partner Judy (right) and me.
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Judy works for the UN in Jerusalem when I can't get her to stay home with me.

Daughter #2: Denna Brand
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Denna, my scuba diver, lives in Kibbutz Sa'ar.
Daughter #1: Mieka Brand
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Mieka, an anthropologist, new mom of twin boys - my first grandchildren!

Mieka's husband, Tony Polanco
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Tony's a Caribbean chef. Lucky Mieka!

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Omer (left) and Eitan, hanging out.

Bro #1 & sis-in-law: Eli and Cookie Schwartz
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But too far away - in Boca Raton, Florida

Bro #2 & sis-in-law, Paul and Sara Schwartz
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My religious brother. Sadly, Sara passed away in 2004.

Bro #2 & new sis-in-law, Paul with Diana Schiowitz
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To live 6 months in Jerusalem (yay!) & 6 months in Florida.

“We don’t believe in pressuring the children.  When the time is right, they’ll choose the appropriate gender.”

Robert Mankoff, New Yorker, February 20, 1995